Boating season is here!

Things are certainly rollin’ in Ohio.  Soon our boat Willow and the new boat that Greg built for someone else will be rolled out of the shop and into the great world, after almost three years of intense labor.  Here are some before and after shots:

Ok, so these are actually an after and then before shot, of Willow’s cockpit.  Amazing what a new paint job will do.

All I can say here is that I can’t wait until I don’t have to climb that extension ladder anymore!  Willow will look more cush when the leecloths and cushions go in.  I’ve already packed most of our boat gear onboard.  I’ll be heading off to work soon in Alaska, and when I return at the end of July, the boats should be floating somewhere along the Tombigbee Waterway, heading south.

Greg was really looking forward to Jason Rose returning from his south pacific cruising to help finish the new boat, but Jason has had quite a time trying to deliver his boat to Hawaii (JasonRose.com).  Even though he’s pretty tired,  he’s feeling some excitement about progress being made; recently he ripped up the plywood shop floor that was over the cement in order to be able to roll the boats out through the big bay doors, and spoke to a guy who is willing to crane them onto flatbed trucks to deliver to a marina with a hoist.  Weather proofing the decks and finishing most wood working projects are the priority now.  These are a couple of new hatch covers:

The interior looks great.  This is the galley:

Hidden from view are all the modern conveniences: AC, fridge, freezer, microwave.  The sink not only has a manual water pump and pressurized water faucet, but a soap and

lotion dispenser.

The sliding doors have been removed in order to install the dish rack.  The freezer hole on the bottom left is also missing its hatch, which is on the work bench in order to install hinges and latches.  Most of what you see is canary wood.

I like this shot, which is the standing room space between the salon and forebunk.  Interesting angles coming together.  It also demonstrates how much trim can go into a small space on a boat!  If you look up at the ceiling where the white panels are installed in between the frames, there are extra (hard to see) trim pieces along the frames to cover the nail heads that attach the panels.  When I did a rough count, there were at least 150 of each of those pieces to measure, cut, and install, when you looked at every panel throughout the boat.  There’s still lots of odds and ends to do on the boat overall, but as far as the big tedious jobs go, this was a big one to get out of the way.

The head is one of the last areas to be finished, mostly because all the wiring has been run through this area and it was easier to leave it be.

The toilet will eventually be on the right.

And this is the reason why the toilet is not yet installed, because the wire area is not quite ready to be covered up.

It’s hard for me to believe that the next time I see Greg and the boats, he’ll be outside, on the water, somewhere around Kentucky I’m guessing, and probably doing a lot of lashing of battens to sails, hopefully with the help of Jason.  Maybe I’ll get to experience something called ‘turn key’ sailing this time around ha ha.

 

It was my intention here to fill you in on all the details from the boat projects, since I am at work on a ship without too many distractions.  I was able to post about one of my projects (The Table Saga), but once I turned to look at photos of Greg’s, I realized that  1)he has so many I don’t know where to start, and  2)the shop is so dusty that most of the photos I’ve taken of his projects do not do him justice.   Take a look at the work tables in the photos  below and see how many items are lined up;  it’s a struggle to carry an item to completion in one straight shot because epoxy will take time to cure and so he often just starts another one in the meantime.

Junk rig sails have numerous wooden battens lashed to the sails (think of venetian blinds), plus the boom and yard (top and bottom edge of sail).  Many hours were spent on these sticks of wood.  It’s hard to make out, but there are quite a lot of tapered edges, through holes, and indentations (to hold the lashings) that had to be cut out, routered, sanded, and painted. Greg was happy to get this project out of the way.

Since I talk about Willow’s table later, I’ll show you a quick pic of the table going into the new boat, made out of canary wood.  Right now the top is folded down.  Someday we’ll wipe everything down and take proper photos.

Schooner literally showed up one day at the shop last fall. I couldn’t resist posting this, as she’s become a part of our lives now.

Greg recently focused on the outer part of the new boat.  The pilot house is attached, as well as the large rudder, plus he had to figure out how to attach the autopilot lines to the tiller.  Measurements were made so that the wind vane could be special ordered.  The two masts have sturdy collars for passing down through the deck to the keel.  Lots of little wooden blocks were epoxied on the decks so that hardware could have hardier bases; hardware such as stanchion posts (safety rails), cleats, bollards, solar fan vents, eyes to lash down dinghy, extra battens, lifeboat, and solar panels.  He welded his own cleats and bollards because they’re much sturdier than what the stores have to offer.  Hatch covers and deck boxes are almost finished.  I’ve also been working on the decks of Willow, painting, creating new islands of non-skid (using sand, which is then painted over with the same paint) and polishing the stainless steel hardware before re-attaching them.  Since all our stainless steel fittings were new when we started out, I had no idea that they could still rust.  Like our friend Cara Troy said, “They just tend to stain LESS….”  I have the much easier job to do.  Greg has to think out, then construct, every little piece.  Which is why we took a much needed vacation to Hawaii recently.  It was hard to tell if he was more physically or mentally fried.

Introducing a new member of the boat fleet: Jake II.  The new, bigger deck boxes up forward on Willow wouldn’t allow our old dinghy to nestle up there anymore, plus a smaller, lighter dinghy would be easier to launch and handle.  The old dinghy also had sailing gear: rudder, keel, mast, and sail.  We actually sailed it TWICE in all those years;  the second photo shows a fun dinghy race we made with friends in the Cook Islands.  I guess when you sail the main vessel all those miles it takes the desire out of sailing the dinghy around, when it’s convenient to use the oars and small outboard.  It’ll also help clean out the clutter when we move back onboard.

Introducing a new member of the boat fleet: Jake II.  The new, bigger deck boxes up forward on Willow wouldn’t allow our old dinghy to nestle up there anymore, plus a smaller, lighter dinghy would be easier to launch and handle.  The old dinghy also had sailing gear: rudder, keel, mast, and sail.  We actually sailed it TWICE in all those years;  the second photo shows a fun dinghy race we made with friends in the Cook Islands.  I guess when you sail the main vessel all those miles it takes the desire out of sailing the dinghy around, when it’s convenient to use the oars and small outboard.  It’ll also help clean out the clutter when we move back onboard.

This is the folding table I built for Willow, as it appeared just after construction.   I have my dad and Bob Deringer to thank for the oak, cherry, and walnut used for the laminate top, and it was fun to put my new woodworking skills on something fun and functional.